Dystopia take a hike! Tales of the Space Patrol.

In this week’s ROCKETEER I talk about how I came to write my illustrated new pulp novelette, Landscape of Darkness. It’s also about something I call Neotopia which is another way of talking about the Age of Aquarius. I’ve been waiting for Aquarius to dawn since the late 1960’s when I became aware of the musical, Hair. Phew, it’s been a long wait but I’m glad it’s finally arrived. According to astrologers, this new age will be quite different from the previous Age of Pisces. And that’s fine with me!…

From the Dark Side: Pulp Master Criminals

I must tell you, it’s a bit weird getting so deeply into detective stories. I’ve always been a fan of Ellery Queen mysteries but this recent deep dive has me wondering how I will feel about writing one. Will I like it as much as science fiction? I guess I’ll know soon. In this week’s ROCKETEER I take a look at where the Moon Man fits on the pulp master criminal spectrum. You can read it here.

The Moon Man Rises

I’ve been obsessing lately about Frederick C. Davis’ “Moon Man” stories from the mid-1930’s. That all came about through a series of synchronicities, the kind that make you think you have something important sitting in your lap. I’m a big fan of Davis’ writing in “Operator No. 5,” another 1930’s series. I like him so much I wanted to read more of his works. I noticed that he had a crazy character with a globe on his head that reminded me of Spiderman’s “Mysterio.” But this seemed a bit different…

Two items of interest today

I just finished a pulpy commission for a fellow writer of science fiction, Sarah Anderson. She wanted an alternate cover for her new book, as well as something she could use for postcards. I was happy to oblige and here is the result. I have to admit that it’s fun to paint people with dramatic expressions. Screaming and running from a creepy monster…what’s more pulpy than that? You can find out more about Sarah’s new book here. Next, on this week’s ROCKETEER I talk about how I conceptualized my award-winning…

Westerns in Space: Or, Space Operas R Us

It’s been a busy couple of days here at the studio. First, I finished up a fun pulpy commission for a new book release. On Wednesday, in The Rocketeer, I wrote about the connection between Westerns and Space Opera (with picture examples!) Read The Rocketeer: “Westerns in Space”  Today, I received a few more books in the mail for my growing Robert Leslie Bellem reprint story collection. I’ve several new paintings planned, and of course new books on the way. In the midst of tremendous world-wide chaos, life can be fun! Count on it!

Roy V. Hunt: A Retrospective, a review

Roy Hunt: A Retrospective book review

I don’t often review books, mainly because I’m either too soft a touch or, if the book is too bad, I don’t want to talk about it. But here is a case of something well worth a review, not just because the book it’s good, but because it’s historically important. Roy V. Hunt: A Retrospective is a treat, both for pulp fanatics and for artists. You can read my review here. 

Is Anyone Incorruptible?

The Face of Parody/Is Anyone Incorruptible?

Fritz Lang’s visuals for Metropolis (1927) fascinate me. The story is pure socialist creed, but the imagery remains powerful even after nearly 100 years. I remember seeing the re-mastered version with Queen’s soundtrack during college. And I’ve seen the anime remake as well as enjoying Queen’s 1984 video– “Radio Ga-Ga” –immensely. (An interesting year for that video to appear on the scene, in my opinion.) Michael Wm Kaluta created outstanding images for a remake book of Metropolis some time ago. It was his drawings that inspired the title of my…

Two Buck Rogers posts

2 Buck Rogers posts meme

Well Space Explorers, it’s time for a couple of Buck Rogers posts. Why…? Mainly because he’s one of the first space heroes and one we still love today. There’s just something about the guy…I’m sure everyone has their reasons for being a fan. I love the early strips from the late 1920’s. They still have enough “wow” appeal to make them enjoyable reading today, nearly 100 years later! So here you go, two little tidbits of Buck Rogers’ lore. One will be familiar and one will not. Happy daydreams! Read…

New Article: John Gunnison and the Home for Adventure

My newest PulpFest Profile is live today. This time, I’ve interviewed John Gunnison of Adventure House. Adventure House is my first shopping stop at every pulp convention. There’s always something wonderful to see, and even books that I can afford to purchase! His reprints are of special interest to me, I keep a bunch on hand for research purposes. I’m excited to find out more about Adventure House and I’ll bet you are, too! Read the article here.

Explorations: The Roots of H. B. Piper’s Dhergabar

Read The Rocketeer over on Substack

I’m a huge fan of H. Beam Piper’s works, particularly his Paratime Police stories. The city of Dhergabar is often mentioned in the stories. It is the First Level city where Paratime Police have their headquarters on “Home” timeline. The name has always struck me as funny, linguistically. Today in The Rocketeer I explore what could possibly be the linguistic roots of the word, Dhergabar. Join me over on Substack to read, “Explorations: The Roots of H. B. Piper’s Dhergabar” — https://tinyurl.com/2p83auhy