Good reviews are always welcome

My new Captain Future article just got a nice mention from the Little Red Reviewer in this week’s Vintage Sci-Fi Round Up! Sara Light-Waller has an excellent profile of Captain Future, at PulpFest. The mythos of Captain Future goes back to the first Worldcon, how cool is that? I’ve seen other nice comments on social media as well. Feeling very grateful today. 🙂

PulpFest Profile — Eighty Years of CAPTAIN FUTURE

Captain Future Vol. 3, No. 2 (Fall, 1941). Cover Art by George Rozen

Oh, for a handsome man in a space suit! *heavy sigh* Curtis Newton, Captain Future, was space opera hero of the 21st Century. Born in 1990, he was the solar system’s greatest defender. Curt was a genius inventor with flaming red hair, a ready laugh and a keen eye for justice. Superman’s Fortress of Solitude was inspired by Future’s secluded base on the Moon. And the Bat-Signal by his North Pole flare. His unhuman sidekicks included a robot, an android, and a disembodied brain. Yes, it all sounds very corny…

Heroines of Science Fiction & Fantasy

I’M PRETTY STUBBORN. I’ve been told that a lot. One of the things I’m stubborn about is that there are worthy heroines in Golden Age science fiction. Looking at those old pulp covers you’d never believe it, I know. But I’ve dug up some pretty interesting gals for my newest article on the Heroines of Science Fiction and Fantasy over at the PulpFest blog. Please join me for some woman-power from the old-school. A gorgeous girl in a colorful bullet bra, matching hot pants and calf-high boots. People believe that…

ROCKETEER FEATURE: It’s A Zwilnik World: How E. E. Doc Smith’s Lensmen Series Imagined a Neotopian Universe

By Sara Light-Waller Fans of classic science fiction are undoubtedly familiar with E. E. “Doc” Smith’s Lensmen series (published from approximately 1937-1954). The books are ultimate space operas where massive fleets harness the power of suns as directed energy weapons and full-size planets as projectiles. The heroes are hard-hitting space warriors, spies, and telepaths in the service of Civilization. That’s some heady stuff right there! But reviewing the Lensmen as works of literature or even as an adventure series is not my purpose today. Instead, I’m going to talk about…

ROCKETEER FEATURE: VENUS IN THE PULPS

STARTL SEP 1949

By Sara Light-Waller “Day again — one hundred and seventy dragging hours of throttling, humid heat. An interminable period of monotony lived in eternal mists, swirling with sluggish dankness, enervating, miasmatic, pulsant with the secret whisperings of mephitic life-forms. That accounted for the dull existence of a Venusian trader, safe in the protection of his stilt-legged trading post twenty feet above the spongy earth — but bored to the point of madness.”  — The Hothouse Planet by A.K. Barnes. Although scientists today take a very different view, in the pulp…

ROCKETEER FEATURE: A DISTINCTLY ALIEN SKY

Symbols of An Alien Sky: Polar Conjunction

by Sara Light-Waller Perhaps the strangest vision of the planet Venus comes from the Thunderbolts Project, a joint study of Comparative Mythology, Cosmology, and Plasma Physics by David Talbott and Wallace Thornhill. This revolutionary synthesis of ancient testimony, high-energy plasma experiments, and space age discoveries suggests that ancient myths and legends have their true origins in extremely violent electrical discharge formations in the heavens. According to the researchers, the skies above Earth were once immensely different from how they appear today. Planets Saturn, Venus, and Mars were much closer to…

A Smashingly Good Review for Landscape!

Star Scene_News Flash

Landscape has received another 5 Star review. The gentleman is himself an author of pulp space opera so the review is even more meaningful. He’s posted it on Amazon and on his blog, Pulp Den. Here’s an excerpt… “Right out of the pulp magazines of the 1930s & ‘40s, the author spins her tale of space opera as if she was writing for Amazing Stories in its heyday. …This was so much fun. I had to stop and check every so often to make sure I wasn’t reading a Captain…