Podcast #16: Superman and the Library of Congress

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This week’s Rocketeer podcast is about two things that don’t really go together and I’m going to treat it as two distinct parts. Part One is what I’d planned to talk about last week, the original origin of Superman. Part Two is about Jazz Age romance novels, something I’m researching at the moment. You can listen to it here. As an addendum I’d like to add an odd little post script. One of the romance novelists I mentioned in my podcast–“Vivian Grey”–was also the pseudonym of 19th century British statesman…

Pete Beard’s Video Channel

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In this week’s ROCKETEER I’m talking about a great find on YouTube–Pete Beard’s Video Channel. If you’re a fan of good illustration, you’ll love this channel. It’s full of well researched videos about illustrators from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including the pulp era! You can read (and listen to) it here.

Podcast #14: Devolution

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In this week’s podcast I’m talking about the idea that humans were once greater or perhaps stranger beings than we are today and have since devolved. I present three pulp-era stories on this topic: Devolution by Edmond Hamilton first appeared in Amazing Stories, in the December, 1936 issue. False Dawn by Henry Kuttner first appeared in Thrilling Wonder Stories in the June 1942 issue. The Code by Catherine Lucille Moore (as by Lawrence O’Donnell) first appeared in Astounding Science Fiction in the July 1945 issue. Join me for the podcast…

A new painting and this week’s Rocketeer

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I’ve been working on my oil pastels again, continuing my study of Hollywood glamour portraits from the 1920’s and 1930’s. These are the sorts of illustrations you’d see on the covers of the A-list fan magazines such as Photoplay. In this week’s ROCKETEER I’m showing off my newest pastel painting and talking about why Hollywood glamour portraits can make a useful study. Read it here.

Podcast #13: “Secrets, Inc.”

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This week’s podcast features Frederick C. Davis’ 1930’s detective series, Secrets, Inc.. This was Davis’ first series for Dime Detective. It ran from 1933 to 1935. The nine stories feature a Hollywood detective named, Clay “Oke” Oakley and take place in and around Hollywood, CA. The plots features some excellent “weird menace” type plots that will keep you on the edge of your seats! Join me on Substack for this week’s ROCKETEER!

Podcast #11: The Outlawed Centaur

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Okay, so this will require a bit of an introduction. It’s a bit like the dog that chased the cat, that ate the rat, that ate the other thing, etc. I discovered British author, Bertram Atkey, while researching some of Nelson S. Bond’s harder to find stories in Blue Book Magazine (from the 1940’s.) Like Bond, Atkey was a good humorist and a story by one of the two was included in each issue during the war years. This was to make sure that the issues didn’t get too heavy.…

Podcast #10: Love Pulps for Valentine’s Day

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What else would I talk about today? tee hee We’ll get back to smart-mouthed ace detectives and handsome space jockeys later on but for today the ROCKETEER is all about love! I’m not sure I’ve ever written about the love pulps before but today seemed a PERFECT day for it. (And I’ve even added some music!) Happy Valentine’s Day, dahlings! You can listen to the ROCKETEER podcast here.

In the Rocketeer: Soldiers and Sports Stars

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This week in the Rocketeer I’m looking at eight specialty wartime pulp covers. They were published in a range from 1943-1946 by Ned Pines, publisher of the “Thrilling Group” of pulp magazines. As a group, they can be taken as wartime propaganda but they are so beautifully rendered and visually interesting that it almost doesn’t matter. Join me for Soldiers and Sports Stars: Wartime Propaganda in the Rocketeer over on Substack.