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Big Day!

FPS opening day banner 2

Today is a big day for me. I have spent the last few months creating a series of new pulp paintings and also rebuilding my studio website—Flying Pony Studios. I’ve added a Woo Commerce shop to that site and this will impact Lucina Press in several ways. The biggest impact is that in the not-too-distant future my eBooks will be for sale over at the Flying Pony Studios shop, along with prints of my book artwork. In other exciting news, my new illustrated novelette—INCORRUPTIBLE—will soon be available in print and…

New Article — “Brother Can You Spare a Dime?”

Brother Can you Spare a Dime meme

I’ve subtitled this article “How The Great Depression Influenced the Pulps” because I believe that when society is truly down there are still bright sparks who transcend what’s happening around them and create anyway. There seems a parallel in today’s society. Those who can still create after two and a half Covid years, a war, and (in the U.S.) madly rising costs of food and fuel, as well as other shortages…well, then you’re doing okay. I had the idea for this article quite a few months ago, noting that the…

Tips for painting in casein

Thrilling detective copy

Casein paint is not as well known today as is acrylics or watercolor. It’s an ancient type of paint, derived from milk protein. It’s fast-drying, and water-soluble. Once dry, the paint becomes water resistant to a large degree. This allows for building in layers as you would with acrylics or oils. The finish is matte and a bit chalky, unlike the shiny surface of acrylics. Casein has been used for both portraits and murals since the late 19th and early 20th centuries. One advantage to this type of paint is…

Robert Graef copy

Graef copy comparison The Spot of Life 1932

Here’s my newest pulp copy, Robert Graef’s cover painting for Argosy August 1, 1932 featuring “The Spot of Life” by Austin Hall. This story is sequel to “The Blind Spot” by Hall and Homer Eon Flint. My painting is mainly watercolor with touches of gouache and pastel. It’s always nice to have an excuse to get back to watercolor, it’s such a beautiful medium and ultimately my favorite. This piece was quite challenging but very fun to do. I worked larger than I normally do for copies — 12″ x…

Reproduction of the “Serpents of Siva” pulp cover

Serpents of Siva comparison

George Rozen cover painting for The Shadow magazine featuring “Serpents of Siva” in the April 1938 issue. This copy was something of an experiment. I was struck by the luminous green color of the buddha and wanted to try to recreate it with colored inks and densely-applied colored pencils. I set it up on Stonehenge paper. This is a heavy paper with good tooth and can take some wetting. I feel the results are a mixed bag. The luminosity comes through but the color isn’t dense enough. Probably, casein or…

New Article — “Cleve Cartmill, The Devil’s in the Details”

Cartmill article meme

Have you ever heard of pulp writer, Cleve Cartmill (1908 – 1964)? If you have it’s probably because of his 1944 story, “Deadline” published in ASTOUNDING. That’s the one that had the FBI knocking on John W. Campbell’s office door. For real! Anyway, Cartmill also wrote pulp fantasy and I picked out three of those to review over at Black Gate. The article includes a brand new illustration by yours truly! Why did I do it? Honestly, the original art for one of the stories was quite hum drum and…

New Article – “The Harp and The Blade: A Bard’s Adventures in Old France”

Harp and Blade meme

I’ve a new article in the online magazine, Black Gate: Adventures in Fantasy Literature. Ironically, the book I’m reviewing is not a fantasy story, even though it was marketed as one for several decades. In fact, it’s an adventure story, originally serialized in Argosy magazine in 1940. The review is meaty, more in depth than I usually go. This time I felt it was well worth my time to dig deeply as it’s an interesting tale and highly enjoyable. You can still find The Harp and the Blade in print…

New article — “Pulp History — The Thrills of 1931”

The Thrills of 1931 ad

I didn’t know too much about Ned L. Pines before writing this article. Of course, I was familiar with the Thrilling  group of pulp magazines (I’m very fond of Thrilling Wonder Stories), and some of his other titles, Captain Future, for example. What I discovered was an ambitious and competent publisher who made a big mark on the Depression-era pulp magazine industry. This month we celebrate the 90th anniversaries of his first three magazines — Thrilling Detective, Thrilling Love, and Thrilling Adventures. FIND OUT MORE about Ned L. Pines at…

New Article — “Allen Steele — Captain Future and Beyond”

Allen Steele interview meme

One of the best parts of being a journalist is that you get to talk to interesting people. Allen Steele and I have a few things in common. We’re about the same age, have a long history writing for, or about, science fiction, and we both have a thing for Edmond Hamilton’s character, Captain Future. (And yes, I know, other people wrote Cap. Future besides Hamilton, but his stories were the best…no one wrote Curt Newton and the Futuremen like he did.) Contemporary author, Allen Steele, has written several new…

New Article — “Galloway Gallegher — Kuttner’s Sauced Scientist”

Robots Have No Tails_1952_2008

It was my birthday at the beginning of the month and along with the festivities came a molasses-like slow-down in my blogging plans. Thus this post is a couple of week’s late. How about we all just pretend that it isn’t late at all? Sound good? Okay, then let’s get to it. My newest article for Black Gate involves a popular Henry Kuttner character — Galloway Gallegher. Gallegher’s shtick/curse is that he’s a genius inventor only when stinking drunk. His attempts to detangle the activities of his sozzled alter-ego are…